Sculpey Mold Maker (Formerly Known as Super Elasticlay) FAQ

Pros, Cons, Tips, and MSDS Safety Sheet Link

Cons

  • Cured molds made with this will harden over time — frequently reported
  • Not really comparable with flexible silicone molds
  • Will crack with heavy use — frequently reported
  • Is better for more shallow molds rather than deep ones with noses, undercuts, etc — frequently reported
  • Not suitable for molding resin, but OK for polymer clay
  • Not suitable for a children’s art medium — that information is actually on the MSDS safety sheet (see below link)

The Usual

  • Must be used with a mold release like talcum powder or cornstarch both when originally making a mold and then again when molding an item from it
  • Make sure you follow manufacturer’s directions
  • As with other polymer clays, it’s all fine until you burn it, then it can release toxic fumes
  • Use in a clean work area or you’ll get dust on it
  • You have to clean your hands well after using it and before you touch other surfaces
  • Use on a craft mat of some sort, as opposed to on a plastic table or wood furniture with any type of finish on it or it can permanently mar surfaces

Pros

  • Takes detail well
  • Longer open time — does not harden until cured in an oven according to manufacturer’s instructions
  • Can be used to soften clay
  • Can be used to make texture sheets (see tip immediately below)
  • Can be made more flexible with Sculpey Diluent (AKA clay softener) (Now there’s a tip you don’t see many places. Less is more, meaning you can always add more diluent to Mold Maker until it’s at it’s prime for your needs, but be careful not to add too much.)

Try

  • Mixing it with Sculpey Bake & Bend (doesn’t handle repeated baking well)
  • Mixing it with Sculpey Ultra Light polymer clay
  • Mixing it with a smaller amount of Sculpey Souffle

Note: All three — Sculpey Bake & Bend, Ultra Light, and Souffle — are somewhat more flexible than many polymer clays. So I suggest experimenting with adding these three clays so that the molds have a little more flexibility to begin with and over time. Still, using it straight or in a mixture like this is not really comparable to the flexibility of commercially manufactured silicone mold compounds (unless there’s some manufactured to be stiff).

MSDS Safety sheet

 

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Raised Scratch Foam Designs in Polymer Clay

Raised Scratch Foam Polymer Clay Designs

Raised Scratch Foam Designs in Polymer Clay

Raised Scratch Foam Polymer Clay Design Test, with notes, by Karen A. Scofield

KarenAScofield Spriograph Clay Texture SheetsNote: This page will be updated as examples are made.

The above picture is only a simple and fast test. It’s not meant to be a prime example, just an example to get your creative juices flowing (and mine). It shows a moon shaped piece of clay with a raised scratch foam design that was colored with Pearl Ex.

I haven’t yet seen others doing it, but yes indeedy, spirographs can be used on scratch foam (Inovart Presto Foam Printing Plate was used in this case) with a ball point pen, ball stylus, or Sakura Gel Pen.

Back at it, Dec. 2016.

KarenAScofield Spriograph Clay Texture Sheets

spirograph clay texture sheet by Karen a Scofield

The Basic Idea

Create a design on scratch foam with a spirograph set and a ball point pen. Press  polymer clay into the design and lift. Add bead holes, etc. You’re looking for spirograph sets that won’t make unintended scratches on the scratch foam. Mine came with “The Spiral Draw” Book.

Taking it Further

Pointillism elements or entire designs be be added inside or around the spirograph design with a ball point pen or ball stylus. The result creates raised clay designs once clay is preseed into it.

Ball point styluses that come in varying sizes can be used for added interest and then needles or beed hole makers can be dragged across the surface, at a slant, to add on to the design too.

Scratch foam designs are probably more commonly used for printing monoprints and other techniques … and also by metal clay artists. They can be earthy/rustic looking or linear and crisp ones.

One can create a bezel complete with boarder designs, with scratch foam designs. What you indent on the foam will be raised on the clay. If you add dimensional writer designs to the scratch foam ones, the clay pressed into it will have both raised and indented designs.

If you use Sakura Gel Pens for the spirograph scratch foam deisgns, many of their inks are oqaque and therefore show up on darker clays. You can press the clay into the fresh scratch foam design and then bake. You may want to seal your design afterward.

Any manner of polymer clay extrusions, applique, relief sculpture, lace impressions/molds, designs for faux enamels, crackling, or designs made with cutters/blades can be applied over the spirograph textured clay passages. If you’re worried about pressing clay together to cause adhesion, because you don’t want to ruin more delicate designs, you may want to use liquid clay or Bake and Bond for adhesion purposes.

With single layer or multi layered scratch foam designs, you create mixed media mosaic tiles, embellishments, beads, and larger clay sheets. You can create molds of the larger clay sheets if you want.

Raised designs can be colored with paint, Sakura Gel Pen ink, inks, or Pearl Ex powders (which are a brand of mica powder). I’d apply paint to baked clay but Sakura Gel Pen, Pearl Ex, and alcohol inks can be applied to raw clay that’s then baked.

You may want to seal baked polymer clay items that have Pearl Ex mica powders or Gel Pens baked onto them. Varathane Water Based varnish is a wonderful sealant for polymer clay pieces.