Polymer Clay Faux Estonian Limestone 2nd Try, by Karen A. Scofield

Polymer Clay Faux Limestone Goddess Bead

Polymer Clay Faux Limestone Goddess Bead by Karen A. Scofield

Polymer Clay Faux Limestone Goddess Bead, by Karen A. Scofield. Picture was taken in natural light. 1st Attempt.

Polymer Clay Faux Estonian Limestone 2nd Try, by Karen A. Scofield

Polymer Clay Faux Estonian Limestone, 2nd Try, by Karen A. Scofield

I have decided to develop my own faux stone polymer clay recipes for beads and other purposes. I’m making my own recipes for two reasons — I want to use what I have (lots of decade-old clay and odds and ends) and then draw on my childhood. It was very tactile and full of color. We went rock hunting as a familiy and both my brothers became geologists. I’m more on the artistic end of things.

My mother was born in Estonia, I never got to visit the country, but this is inspired by Tufa limestone from there. It’s associated with springs, is a chemically precipitated soft and porous limestone. I have some inclusions I’ll want to add to the clay, they’re in the oven right now, so future versions may include them.

Polymer Clay Goddess Beads by Karen A. Scofield

Polymer Clay Goddess Beads by Karen A. Scofield. Baked two. The left is of Fimo Soft Marble and the right is of the artist’s own faux limestone recipe. Picture was taken in evening indoor lighting this time. 1st attempt at Tufa limestone. Needs improvement.

Anyway, while the grandson took his afternoon nap, I did a visual study of different limestones, and quickly pulled out some of my older clays, sand, beach stones from the local beach, half an old wanut shell, some crumbly old clay mixes, my molds, and embossing powders.

I have an ever-growing stash of my own bead prototypes and their molds that I occasionally pull out to play with various faux polymer clay rock/wood/semiprecious  stone recipes. Thank goodness for two-part silicone mold putty like Amazing Mold Putty! Very durable stuff. Anyway, here texture and other touches are added after molding, that’s where the pitted beach stones and old walnut half come in, and sometimes the bead has to be reshaped a bit after being textured. I seek to explore both ancient and modern renditions of goddess/mom/fertility beads like these.

Here’s to winging it and eyeballing things, to being in the flow! The inner critic seems to shut up then. 🙂