Karen’s High Chroma, Luminosity-Loving Paint Color Palette

Note: Page may be subject to updates.

My Directional Force — Indirct Painting With Glaze layers


Sfumato indirect painting technique
, here I come! I expect to do inital layers of a painting in acrylic and some glazing layers in water soluble oil paints (Winsor & Newton Artisan), for starters. That’s why my previous entry was about water soluble oils.

I also want to try to do the indirect method from start to finish with artist grade acrylic paints. And some wild and crazy experimental Alla Prima.

karensfourthsunblackandwhitetonal

Black and white of Karen A. Scofield’s anthropomorphized sun. Tonal.

 

I’ve only completed 5 paintings thus far, you see a B&W of my fourth, above. These are my notes in preparation of pushing harder and farther, way out of my comfort zone, if I have a comfort zone. I don’t know where my zone is. Yet. But I’ve dug for years now, into paint pigments, direct vs. indirect, sfumato techniques, and many artist materials … in preparation. And I liked it. I am a digger and I tend to over-prepare anyway; it’s very much deeply in my nature.

Note on Paint Brands Used Until They Are Gone

Overall, I am using mainly artist grade paint with the occasional use of some hues or somewhat informed alternative color mixes, wet and layered. Acrylic mediums will help with the sfumato technique. The brands I have include:

  • Golden Acrylics (artist colors heavy body, Open, or Fluid)
  • Liquitex ( heavy body, soft body, spray paint, acrylic ink)
  • Da Vinci Fluid Acrylics.  I have a lot of da Vinci fluid acrylics because they were cheaper, but they  are in some cases made of combined pigments instead of using pure pigment … so this should be interesting. It’ll mess up value ( how light or dark things are in grayscale) a bit and may make me cringe sometimes especially with the yellows.

I will just have to be aware of that, for instance, Cadmium Yellow Light Da Vinci Fluid Acrylics, specifically, might have a lighter value because it includes titanium dioxide. I’ll just have to deal with that because I have mostly, by volume, 16 ounce bottles of Da Vinci Fluid acrylics, as far as the fluid acrylics I have are concerned. (I have the paints I do because I got them after my mom died. I miss her so much!)

A Happy Medium: Making Golden Acrylics Have More Open Time and Act Kind of Like Oils

This happy medium is one suggestion that appeals to me. Not sure if it’ll work as well with regular heavy body colors or fluid acrylics, but it’s worth a try in the upper layer(s) of an indirect method acrylic painting. Do studies first. Read the bottles and manufacturer’s information online. The Golden Paint  Company has an absolute wealth of product and technical information on their website. And as always, remember you can always add more of something but once it’s mixed in then it’s in there.

  • Open Flow Release — a bit
  • Open Open Thinner — a bit
  • Open Gloss Gel — mostly

Paint Palettes: Color Theory, Sfumato, My Own Extended One

In the future, I probably will gravitate towards more Golden Open artist color acrylics?

6 Color Golden Acrylic Artist colors (not including the whites), the palette would include: 

  1. Phthalo Blue (Green Shade) 
  2. Phthalo Green (Blue Shade) 
  3. Anthraquinone Blue (PB 60)
  4. Hansa Yellow Medium 
  5. Quinacridone Magenta 
  6. Napthol Red Light 

The 6 main colors in bold can yield an amazing array of colors. See https://www.goldenpaints.com/technicalinfo_mixguide and https://www.goldenpaints.com/technicalinfo_faq_xv_colorwheel

Studying color theory with Golden Open paints in these colors in a rapid Alla Prima style, I’d put down the basic colors and then create tints of about 5 shades, laid out in rows, using Titanium White and/or Mixing White, and begin to paint. Or so the theory goes.

Additions to the 6 Color Paint Palette (above)

In practice, I’d probably end up slipping in a little:

7. Quinacridone Red
8. Yellow Ochre
9. Mixing White
10. Titanium White

My Main Sfumato Color Palette

This palette would be assisted by the above 6-color mixing palette. The color choices between the two palettes are are my amalgam of pigments traditional and modern — influenced by what Leonardo da Vinci reported using and by my own research on making/using modern equivalents. (Colors are some form of Golden Acrylics artist grade paint unless otherwise noted.)

  1. Primrose Yellow (preferred, expensive, pigment PY35, Golden Acrylics, value 9, chroma 16, tint strength 96.49) or Hansa Yellow Light (what I have now, will use first, value 8.25, chroma 13.8, tint strength 96.31, tint strength is low in practice, pigment is PY3 AKA historical “Flanders Yellow” that Leonardo da Vinci mentioned); both lean toward blue on the color wheel
  2. Cadmium Yellow Medium (Golden Artist Color PY35, value 8, chroma 16.1, tint strength 92.5); or Cadmium Yellow Medium Hue (Da Vinci Fluid Acrylic, semi-opaque, ASTM lightfastness is 1 excellent, uses a combination of PY 73, PY 65, and PW6, not sure of chroma and tinting strength yet); both toward red on the color wheel
  3. Quinacridone Red (preferred, a cleaner red, semi-transparent, PB 209, value 3.25, chroma 12, tint strength 76.49), Quinacridone Magenta (value 2.5, chroma 10, tint strength 73.51) , and/or Quinacridone Crimson (value 2, chroma 6, tint strength 72.39)
  4. C.P. Cadmium Red — Because sometimes you need an opaque that plays well with complementary colors. (Pr 108, value 4.25, chroma 16, tinting strength 73.92, opacity/transparency 2, leans toward orange on the color wheel. May become a permanent addition to my indirect paint palette
  5. Phthalo Blue (PB 15 Phthalocyanine Blue. Intense deep blue in mass tone reddish to greenish bright blue in shades. Semi-transparent. Extremely powerful tint strength, usually extended to some degree. Staining.)
  6. French Ultramarine (Da Vinci Fluid Acrylic PB 29, value 2, semi-transparent, chroma 4.5, tint strength 79.94) or Ultramarine (Golden, also PB29)
  7. Burnt Umber 
  8. Yellow Ochre (mixed bias, co
  9. Carbon Black (has a blue bias)
  10. Titanium White (slight blue bias)

Note: The reds in #3 may be switched out or combined in certain works?

The Sfumato Technique

In case you’re curious, the technique started even before canvas or panel was touched and continued on to the last glaze layer. It went something like this:

  • Do numerous studies from real life; don’t copy other artists
  • Perfect a drawing the size of the final work — on paper
  • Stretch the canvas or prepare the wooden paint panel
  • Apply rabit glue and gesso in the traditional manner; and somehow he got this surface to feel glossy, almost like ceramic
  • Apply underdrawing in outline using charcoal
  • Veil it, not obscure it, with a mix of Flanders Yellow and White — this will be the basis for light areas and the yellow tones of warm sunlight or skin tone
  • “Draw” painting with tone using silk brushes placing shadows while paint still wet or use hard (dry, like hard pastel pencils)
  • Do retouches in thicker laquer (they used to boil turpentine that perhaps had some resin in it until it was thick, is that what he meant?) that remains matte
  • To darken shadows, use laquer plus ink and maybe add some azurite in a transparent mix
  • Highlights in mediums and tints
  • Light veil of cinnabar for portrait
  • Change your mind — be experimental
  • I’m really glossing things over in this description. Colors were layered and the effects of light and shade were glazed. For a blue robe, he might first lay down red and then blue over that. Was that a correction or use of complements, and he did mention using complement colors.
  • He attended to reflective colors a lot, colors from objects close by might appear on the skin and light clothing, and he did suggest models wear light clothing or even a white.
  • Final highlights in judicious smidgens were in white?  I know highlights were made like this by many painters, I sm not sure that Leonardo did this though.

For translating this into acrylics, I might use that Golden Open “happy medium” mixture instead of the thick lacquer da Vinci used.

Temperature Underpaintings (Mostly Golden Open Acrylics)

  1. Black
  2. Titanium White  Also used for final highlights in upper layer, used judiciously
  3. Mixing White (Zinc) — Also for use in some final effects in upper layer. May or may not mix it with other paints, as opposed to optical blends and effects
  4. Burnt Umber/Burnt Umber Light — To be used alone and/or with the Ultramarine Blue
  5. Red Oxide — Because I have to try out aux quatre crayon type of temperature “underdrawing” … in paint! I will try it in dry pastel pencils too.  These works may remain at that stage as finished paintings, rather than all being just the under painting of an sfumato work. I may be intuitively good at colors without trying, up to a point, but I am just now teaching myself to paint in my later 50s, regarding value (that grayscale light to dark). I have a lot of catching up to do. I accomplished value rather well in my (my fourth finished painting) anthropomorphic painting of the sun, but I recognize that I have so much farther to go!

My Golden Acrylics Extended Palette
(for Wet Color Mixing or Additional Sfumato Indirect Painting Effects)

Colors in bold text would be more of a priority in this palette.

  • Phthalo Blue (Green Shade)
  • Phthalo Green (Blue Shade) 
  • Hansa Yellow Light
  • Hansa Yellow Medium
  • Quinacridone Magenta
  • Quinacridone Red
  • Quinacridone Crimson
  • Napthol Red Light
  • Pyrrole Red
  • Quinacridone Burnt Orange
  • Transparent Pyrrole Orange
  • Phthalo Green (Yellow Shade)
  • Phthalo Blue (Red Shade)
  • Ultramarine Blue/Anthraquinone Blue (PB 60)
  • Burnt Umber
  • Black (used judiciously now and then in small touches)
  • Yellow Ochre
  • Titanium White
  • Mixing White

Additional Colors On Occasion or just for Fun (Optional)

  1. Quinacridone Gold (Nickel Azo) — Because it’s fun for color mixing and glazing.
  2. Turner’s Yellow — Fuuuun!

Note: Since I’m autodidactic, I may pull in more readymade colors at any time when experimenting more wildly. Oh, and if you want to see where your colors lay on a color wheel, go here. I can’t resist paint colors, as much as I love limited palettes and minding my values in painting! Because I must experiment. Life is short. And I bought paint colors before painting anything or learning about limited palettes.

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Art Journal. Why Magic? by Karen A. Scofield.

So I’m Doing Art Journaling Finally

A Few Sample Pages of My First Art Journal

Of course, it all starts with love, four words for love, then it covers reciprocity, examining what kind of power we have in our relationships from personal to public and political. After that, I talk about making reality according to will, because chances are, if we examine love, power, and reciprocity then we’ll want to make changes.

First, I experimented with backgrounds made with acrylic craft paints. There are some neon, glow, and fluorescent colors in there. I added some mica misters (sprays) on top on some pages but not others. Uni Posca paint pens and “Moonlight” Sakura Gelly Roll gel pens were used on all pages so far. These particular gel pens don’t have to be sealed once dried but the Posca paint pens remain water-soluble and do best with several layers of Krylon matte sealant for that reason. The spray sealant also happens to solve the issue of acrylic painted art journal pages tending to stick together.

I’m diving into some art journaling as I wait for my clay pieces to get fired. It’s taking quite some time as the art gallery’s kiln needed new parts and only recently got them. Because of that, they’re behind and still have to fire my pendants. I’m not doing anymore glazing until I know if this works out and what to expect.

Art Journal. Words for Love from Agape to Praxis. Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

Art Journal. Words for Love from Agape to Praxis. Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

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Art Journal. Why Magic?

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Art Journal Spread "Words!" by Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

Art Journal Spread “Words!” by Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

Aphrodite Over Time. Goddess. Art Journaling. Grimoire is to spell or write. K. Scofield. 2016.

Aphrodite Over Time. Goddess. Art Journaling. Grimoire is to spell or write. K. Scofield. 2016.

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Art Journal. The Great Meta Goddess

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Art Journal. Equality.

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Art Journal Pages. Karen A. Scofield. 2016. Credit for Law of Magic goes to Isaac Bonewits.

Art Journal Pages. Karen A. Scofield. 2016. Credit for Law of Magic goes to Isaac Bonewits.

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Glow-in-the-Dark Anthropomorphized Sun Painted by Karen A. Scofield. 2016. Acrylics on Canvas, 18"x18".

My Fifth Painting is A Glow-in-the-Dark Anthropomorphized Sun

It’s sister is in ArtWorks Kenosha for the next open show. They both have leaves and flowers because I’m thinking green, renewable energy, we get all of our energy from the sun. It’s an awesome creative force. Let’s respect that.

This one’s for family and it’s 18″ by 18″ on canvas. Oh yeah, and I love glow-in-the-dark paints. They went over the top surface of the already finished painting as they were transparent enough. In a week, I’ll add an isolation coat and a week or two after that, I’ll add a varnish layer on top.

Glow-in-the-Dark Anthropomorphized Sun Painted by Karen A. Scofield. Noir Iphone Filter. 2016. Acrylics on Canvas, 18"x18".

Glow-in-the-Dark Anthropomorphized Sun Painted by Karen A. Scofield. Noir Iphone Filter. 2016. Acrylics on Canvas, 18″x18″.

Glow-in-the-Dark Anthropomorphized Sun Painted by Karen A. Scofield. 2016. Acrylics on Canvas, 18"x18".

Glow-in-the-Dark Anthropomorphized Sun Painted by Karen A. Scofield. 2016. Acrylics on Canvas, 18″x18″.

Painting of an Anthropomorphized Sun Shimmer," 24"x24", by Karen A. Scofield. 2016

My Fourth Painting: “Shimmer,” 24″x24″

Painting of an Anthropomorphized Sun Shimmer,

Painting of an Anthropomorphized Sun Shimmer,” 24″x24″, by Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

 

karensfourthsunblackandwhitetonal

Black and white of Karen A. Scofield’s anthropomorphized sun. Tonal.

 

Painting of an Anthropomorphized Sun Shimmer,” 24″x24″, by Karen A. Scofield. 2016. If you stare at the sun’s face, optical illusions come into play.

It’s going to be in the next open show at Artworks Kenosha (WI). It has a bit of an optical illusion to it.

I had done a study for the painting previously but the quality of work in this painting is far more professional and I painted while through a magnifying glass for a lot of this, not that doing so defines professional or fine art.

I used an isolation layer using Golden Polymer Medium before varnishing it.

Here are some stages of the work before completion.

 

DIY Blank Canvas Board Book to Use as an Art Journal

I Made 11 x 14 Inch Blank Canvas Board Book Pages

Personalized cover is next.

Basic Instructions

I glued and taped only — no cutting (except cutting tape). Two sides board pages are covered wtih canvas paper, AKA acrylic paper. The board “pages” are ready for a cover. The cover will be made out of Kraft-tex fabric paper with something to stiffen the cover (some kind of paper board probably … whatever I find I have on hand). Time to make this portion of my canvas board book? About 30 minutes of hands-on time, give or take ten minutes, I didn’t time it. Making the cover will probably take more time, as I’ll decorate it.

Materials:

  • 10 of 11 x 14″ Soho Urban Artist Painting Panels
  • 10 sheets of Canson XL Acrylic Canvas Paper (NOT the Canson Montval paper!)
  • Reinforced Duct Tape (the wide roll size)
  • Scissors
  • About 6 or so Scotch Permanent Glue Sticks, the .28 oz size
  • Aleene’s Original Tacky Glue, or something comparative that’s thick but that doesn’t dry too fast
  • Baby powder and and old, clean cosmetic brush, the large kind
  • Large, strong needle with a head wide enough for your string
  • Very strong carpet thread or bookbinding thread
  • Fabric for Cover — I’ll probably use Kraft-tex paper fabric I’ll cut to size, decorate, etc.

Method

On a stable, smooth, and flat work surface, I laid two of the Soho canvas panels side by side in portrait sytle mode — the taller sides will be verticle on my book. That means the book will stand 14 inches call and will be, when open, 22″ wide. The boards will nearly touch each other when they lay open, so I can use two sides of the open book for one finshed picture, save the first and last sides.

For taping purposes, the boards are facing canvas texture side down, with their bare “SpHo” printed backs facing you.

Before taping two boards together, I created a gap large enough so that once the pages are folded, they’ll fold flat without too much slack. This means the finished book will shift around less, making it less likely to come undone. The gap is minutely wider than the thickness of the boards, thus allowing for movement of the pages later.

I taped the pages together with the gap in place, making sure the pages and gap stayed even. I then folded the pages with the canvas paper side of the boards facing each other and the bare sides on the outside. I repeated this process until I had a stack of taped-together SoHo canvas boards. I got my canvas Soho boards from jerrysartarama.com, on sale of course.

Next, I got the glue sticks and bottle of tacky glue out. I got these at Sams Club and Walmart a while back and they need to be used up before they’re not any good anymore. That’s what happens when you buy glue sticks in bulk, I guess. Anyway, I rapidly covered one bare side of one taped set of boards with the glue stick, taking care to cover up to about a 1/4″ from the 4 edges of the board. When using the glue sticks, it helps not to press down to hard or at an angle — you don’t want them to leave clumps of glue all over your board.

Next, I rapidly squeezed out a thread of glue right by each edge and on the duck tape, not on the very edge but right by it, taking care to lay down just enough and not too much. I have previous gluing experience and that helped here.

Without wasting time, I then took one of the Canson XL Acrylic Canvas Paper sheets (which is much better than the Canson Montval or even the SoHo panel canvas panel surface) and laid it onto the glue, with the sheet’s canvas texture side up, facing toward me. I quickly made sure it was positioned correctly.

Using the outer side of a closed fist, I started rubbing the canvas paper into place on the canvas board, rubbing from one side to the other and then around each edge of each side, carefully coming right up to the very edge but without getting glue all over my fingers or hand. Rubbing from one side to the other of the canvas board helps ensure there are no air bubbles and that all areas have made solid contact with the glue below.

Using a slightly damp wet wipe or bit of paper towel, I deftly wiped away the minute bits of glue that were squeezed out during that process. I wiped, folded the wipe over the glue i picked up that way, wiped the next side, and so on. This meant my hands and the canvas paper surfaces stayed free of glue.

I covered only one bare side of each taped set of boards at a time. made sure the boards couldn’t stick together, and then routinely covered only one bare side on each set of taped boards, leaving one bare side for later. I had to go drive my daughter to work while it was drying, so that worked out fine.

I returned to my stack and then closed each set of taped boards so the sticky portion of the tape was peaking toward the outside of each folded set.

It was time for the baby powder. I dusted the strips of sticky tape that were barely showing with the baby powder.

I then poked evenly spaced holes so that the pages are ready to connect them, by way of sewing with the thread, to the cover once that’s done…

As For Sewing the Book Binding…

I had watched several book binding videos like this one. It shows a sewn binding method.

Raised Scratch Foam Designs in Polymer Clay

Raised Scratch Foam Polymer Clay Designs

Raised Scratch Foam Designs in Polymer Clay

Raised Scratch Foam Polymer Clay Design Test, with notes, by Karen A. Scofield

KarenAScofield Spriograph Clay Texture SheetsNote: This page will be updated as examples are made.

The above picture is only a simple and fast test. It’s not meant to be a prime example, just an example to get your creative juices flowing (and mine). It shows a moon shaped piece of clay with a raised scratch foam design that was colored with Pearl Ex.

I haven’t yet seen others doing it, but yes indeedy, spirographs can be used on scratch foam (Inovart Presto Foam Printing Plate was used in this case) with a ball point pen, ball stylus, or Sakura Gel Pen.

Back at it, Dec. 2016.

KarenAScofield Spriograph Clay Texture Sheets

spirograph clay texture sheet by Karen a Scofield

The Basic Idea

Create a design on scratch foam with a spirograph set and a ball point pen. Press  polymer clay into the design and lift. Add bead holes, etc. You’re looking for spirograph sets that won’t make unintended scratches on the scratch foam. Mine came with “The Spiral Draw” Book.

Taking it Further

Pointillism elements or entire designs be be added inside or around the spirograph design with a ball point pen or ball stylus. The result creates raised clay designs once clay is preseed into it.

Ball point styluses that come in varying sizes can be used for added interest and then needles or beed hole makers can be dragged across the surface, at a slant, to add on to the design too.

Scratch foam designs are probably more commonly used for printing monoprints and other techniques … and also by metal clay artists. They can be earthy/rustic looking or linear and crisp ones.

One can create a bezel complete with boarder designs, with scratch foam designs. What you indent on the foam will be raised on the clay. If you add dimensional writer designs to the scratch foam ones, the clay pressed into it will have both raised and indented designs.

If you use Sakura Gel Pens for the spirograph scratch foam deisgns, many of their inks are oqaque and therefore show up on darker clays. You can press the clay into the fresh scratch foam design and then bake. You may want to seal your design afterward.

Any manner of polymer clay extrusions, applique, relief sculpture, lace impressions/molds, designs for faux enamels, crackling, or designs made with cutters/blades can be applied over the spirograph textured clay passages. If you’re worried about pressing clay together to cause adhesion, because you don’t want to ruin more delicate designs, you may want to use liquid clay or Bake and Bond for adhesion purposes.

With single layer or multi layered scratch foam designs, you create mixed media mosaic tiles, embellishments, beads, and larger clay sheets. You can create molds of the larger clay sheets if you want.

Raised designs can be colored with paint, Sakura Gel Pen ink, inks, or Pearl Ex powders (which are a brand of mica powder). I’d apply paint to baked clay but Sakura Gel Pen, Pearl Ex, and alcohol inks can be applied to raw clay that’s then baked.

You may want to seal baked polymer clay items that have Pearl Ex mica powders or Gel Pens baked onto them. Varathane Water Based varnish is a wonderful sealant for polymer clay pieces.

Cloth-Paper

Note: My review of the exciting commercially made cloth-paper, called Kraft-tex, is https://karenascofield.wordpress.com/2015/01/02/initial-review-of-kraft-tex-paper-cloth-and-notes/

Why I’m Excited About Cloth-Paper

It’s been a focus in many books,  magazines, blogs and even a DVD. You can make it with many “ingredients” or few. It can be simple or amazingly beautiful and rich with colors, textures and cultural references. It can be addicting. It can be meditative. It can be useful or purely decorative. It can save you money and it can cost you money. It can be a way of getting rid of odds and ends or an excuse to go OC on collecting stuff.

What Can You Make With It?

Handmade Blank Canvas Board Art Journal, by Karen. A. Scofield. Bound with a beaded coptic stitch.

Handmade Blank Canvas Board Art Journal, by Karen. A. Scofield. Bound with a beaded coptic stitch. Front cover made with handmade cloth-paper.

Wallets, ATCs (artist trading cards), paint brush holders, zip pouches, tote bags, customized binder covers, book covers, corsets, handbags, slippers, hats, other wearables, customized organizers, book markers, art quilts, stuffed voodoo dolls, beads, a variety of fabric embellishments, belly dancing belts…the list goes on. It can be thicker, thinner, machine stitched, embroidered, hand beaded, glued, duct taped, fused, painted, stamped, collected, traded, and more.  It’s generally tougher to sew by hand but that can be done most times. Other names for it are fabric paper, muslin paper, fabric fusion, or tissue fabric…and some people even spell it “clothpaper.” Sometimes it’s hyphenated, sometimes it’s not.

The Basic Steps

Here are Beryl Taylor’s basic steps for making fabric paper: Freezer paper, muslin, glue-water, spaced paper and other bits, glue-water, craft tissue, watery paints, let dry, peel, use. She’s well known for making beautiful works out of fabric paper and has both a book and video out on it.  I have them and they’re well worth it. She’s amazing.

  1. Lay a piece of washed, open-weave muslin on the waxy side of freezer paper and wet it all over with diluted PVA glue. The freezer paper or plastic should be larger than the muslin.
  2. Lay wrapping paper, images, text, etc., into the wet glue, leaving spaces in between.
  3. Apply another coat of diluted PVA glue over that. Embed craft tissue (tissue paper) into the wet glue layer.
  4. While the glue is still wet, paint on dyes using a sponge applicator.
  5. Let dry completely before cutting and stitching. This can take several hours to several days.

A Few Notes on the Glues — I had questions, so many questions, and this is what I found out.

  • Acrylic Matte GelThis is a artist grade acrylic medium that you can order online and from brick and mortar stores like Michael’s or Hobby Lobby. It’s water-resistant once dry and PVA glue isn’t.  Mixed-media fabric artist and author,  Sherill Kahn mentions using acrylic matte medium instead of PVA glue. Mixed-Media Master Class with Sherrill Kahn: 50+ Surface-Design Techniques for Fabric & Paper. ISBN-10: 160705423X; ISBN-13: 978-1607054238
  • Sobo — Many use Sobo fabric and paper glue, a PVA glue, because of its hand and flexibility once it’s dry…but it’s water-soluble once dry. I found mine in Joann’s for $2.99 a 4 oz. bottle.
  • Lineco Neutral pH Adhesive — Others are using archival (won’t degrade papers over time) Lineco Neutral pH Adhesive, which is also a flexible PVA glue that’s water-soluble even after drying. Of course, using archival glues doesn’t help if all your papers aren’t archival. Most people are using what they have rather than archival tissue and other papers.
  • Fabric Mod Podge –Mod Podge fabric is something you can try and it’s washable once dried. Experiment to see if it can be diluted for this. http://modpodgerocksblog.com/learn-how-to-mod-podge

Cost Comparison If bought in a gallon jug through dickblick.com, Lineco Neutral pH Adhesive presently costs the same as Sobo which does not come in gallon jug containers. Fabric Mod Podge does not come in larger containers and can end up being your most expensive option, although you can frequently use a coupon when buying it in a Michaels store. Per liquid oz, Liquitex Matte Gel acrylic medium costs the least, if I buy it off of dickblick.com. If you buy it with a 40% off coupon in a brick and mortar store, it’s about the same cost as your PVA glues. You may do your own cost comparisons, of course.

That Moisture Concern

Personally, I’m leaning toward using Fabric Mod Podge and/or Liquitex Matte Gel. The cat, the baby, the cup that tips over, the bottle that leaks in your purse…the humidifier that leaked all over to the table…stuff happens.

Notes on Tissue Paper

So far, I’ve been using weak tissue paper I had around and it ripped while using it. Sigh. So not all tissue paper is strong enough for this, though some people say the torn tissue paper gives cloth paper character. Look through product reviews for complaints that the tissue paper is too substantial or seek out craft tissue paper that’s known to stand up to a lot of tasks. That’s the tissue paper you want.  The only Japanese tissue paper I could find, which is what Beryl Taylor prefers, costs about 20 times more than craft or substantial packaging tissue paper and I could only find it online. No, I’m not paying over 1 dollar plus shipping for Japanese tissue paper.  I was thinking of getting some “Bulk Basic White Tissue Paper 15″ x 20″ – 100 Sheets,” by Premium Quality Gift Wrap Paper: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0062MQY3C/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=AS03ME368F813

Made with tissue papers, cotton fabric, water, glue, and paints. Can be sewn.

Made with tissue papers, cotton fabric, water, glue, and paints. Can be sewn. This cloth-paper was used to make the cover of a coptic stitched art journal.

Fabric paper

Cloth Paper: Faux Fish Skin

A Recipe for Fabric Paper Textured with Cheesecloth  

Materials

  • Something You Can Peel Your Dried Paper Cloth from Once Dry— Plastic sheets, garbage bag plastic, that wide roll waxy freezer paper – use whatever you have that you can peel your dried fabric paper off of once it’s dried.  You can even use washed plastic dog food bag (what I’m using).
  • Cotton Fabric — Muslin or other thin, plain cotton fabric (must be pre-washed to remove any sizing)
  • Thin, Absorbant Papers — Tissue papers and/or printed paper napkins (some of them are quite beautiful)
  • Cheesecloth – Cheesecloth can be bought in Walmart, some grocery stores, fabric stores, or online.
  • Optional Odds and Ends — Scrap papers, brown paper bag, metallic candy wrappers, pre-washed fabrics, ribbon, flocking, rock dust, dryer lint, silk roving, dried rose petals, leaf skeletons, glitter…. just any kind of ephemera to make your layers and what makes you happy.
  • Glue — Sobo glue, Fabric Mod Podge, Lineco Neutral pH Adhesive and/or Liquitex Matte Gel acrylic medium.
  • Colors— Fabric paint, acrylic paint (craft or fine art paint kinds), alcohol inks (e.g. Adirondack), Dyna-Flow, etc. Many of the fluid acrylic colors are rather transparent and can be diluted with water, making them ideal. They go a long way because of their incredible pigment load and give superior results. That’s why Beryl Taylor uses Golden Fluid Acrylics in her video.
  • Brush — Foam paintbrush or cheap craft paint brush. Foam brushes are often preferred for mashing layers without tearing them.
  • Optional Mark Makers – Gel pens, dimensional paint, permanent markers (some colors may bleed over time – test)

Method to Make Fabric Paper  

  1. Lay Out the Muslin — Lay your crumpled or ironed fabric on your waxed paper or plastic surface. This is going to be very messy. For the glue-water, the minimum amount of glue is 2 T per half cup of water but 1:1 glue to water mix is quite common. That’s equal parts of glue and water, whether your glue is Liquitex Matte Gel acrylic medium, Sobo, or Lineco.  (I’m not sure if Fabric Mod Podge can be diluted. I’ll have to experiment. Or you can.)
  2. Add Color to your matte medium or glue and water mixture — Add some color; either fabric paint or acrylic craft paint.
  3. Brush to Saturate — Using a foam brush, saturate your lightweight cotton fabric of choice with the colored glue or matte medium water mixture. Have no dry edges of areas.
  4. Add Tissue Paper(s) – Apply a whole sheet or torn strips of tissue paper onto the web fabric with the flat side of the foam brush, mashing it down. You can use either flat or scrunched up tissue paper. Use enough glue-water to flatten it down. You may color the glue water with acrylic paint if you like. The result you want is flattened and has no air bubbles.
  5. Add Cheese Cloth — Cut a whole sheet, strips or bits of cheesecloth and mash onto the top of the tissue paper too. Make sure it’s web with glue-water. You may scrunch it up a bit in areas. Added Touches — Add bits and pieces for any type of contrast you like (light and dark, contrasting colors). You can use papers, bits of yarn, thread snippings…use your imagination but they have to be totally wet with glue-water.
  6. Dry Thoroughly — Let dry for 24 hours or more. Peel. Use your fabric paper in a variety of ways. It can be layered and stitched by machine or by hand. Use the stronger sewing machine needles for thicker fabric paper – 70/80 or 90/100, respectively. You may have to replace machine needles more often when sewing fabric paper.

Recipe for Dryer Sheet Fabric Paper (Can Make Flexible or Stiffer)

This is the kind of stuff that some might call “tissue fabric.”

Materials

  • Used dryer sheet
  • Strong PVA glue or Liquitex Matte Gel acrylic medium, etc.
  • Freezer paper/waxed paper, cereal bag from inside cereal boxes, plastic type of table cloth, or plastic washed dog food bag that’s flattened out (use what you have but it has to be larger than the fabric paper you want to make)
  • Masking tape
  • Brush for glue
  • Acrylic paints (artist grade, Dyna Flow) and alcohol inks
  • Scrap papers, brown paper bag, metallic candy wrappers, fabrics, dried rose petals, leaf skeletons, ribbon, flocking, rock dust, dryer lint, silk roving, Angelina paper, Angelina Fiber, glitter…

Method to Make Fabric Paper

  1. Protected Surface – Whatever you use, you must be able to later peel your fabric paper off this surface without damage to the surface or your fabric paper. Tape a sheet of freezer paper or waxed paper, whatever you chose to work on, to a piece of cardboard or other board you want to work on. Place this on a level surface. Or tilt it if you’re innovating with coloring it, you dare devil you. But it’ll have to lay it flat to dry.
  2. Lay Down Used Fabric Softener Dryer Sheet. Tape it down on the waxed paper if you like.
  3. Glue-Water — Mix glue and water using a 1:1 ratio. Or mix matte gel and water using a 1:1 ratio. That’s equal parts of water and glue. The glue will be water soluble once dry and the matte gel won’t be.
  4. Pour and Spread— Pour the glue-water on the sheet in the middle and spread out until it covers the entire surface. You may mash and tap the wetness all over. Leave no area dry.
  5. Add Paper and Stuff — Layer and down decorative napkins, tissues papers, fabric, ribbon and thin papers.  Use more glue-water over these. Don’t worry, it’ll dry clear and adds strength.  Layers add strength; how much strength and how many layers is up to you.
  6. Color — Alcohol Inks, Glitter Sprays, Dynaflow, Acrylic Paints – Drip, brush or spray these on as you know how.  You can use craft or acrylic paints. Weeeee!
  7. Layer— Keep adding, layers until you’re satisfied.  Mash and press down the glued pieces, making sure they come in good contact with the layer below it. You may lay down plastic wrap and a book top of it and let it dry completely. Make sure there’s enough plastic wrap to protect both the book and fabric cloth. If do this, it’ll take longer to dry, of course.
  8. Dry— Let it dry several hours, 24 hours, or longer. It must be completely dry.
  9. Peel — Peel your dried fabric paper off of your waxed/freezer paper or other surface you were working on.

Using Your Fabric Paper Use your fabric paper in a variety of ways. It can be layered and stitched by machine or by hand. It can be glued. It can be used in art journals, greeting cards, ATCs (artist trading cards), bags, totes, purses, fabric bowls, functional items, jewelry, and various types of embellishments. Use the stronger sewing machine needles for thinner and thicker fabric paper – 70/80 or 90/100, respectively. You may have to frequently replace machine when sewing fabric paper.

Recipe to Fused Brown Paper Bag

See Maggie Grey’s “Background 3” in her book (see the resources section below).

Recipe for Laminated Paper Fabric

I haven’t tried it but it’s a thought. Place on silicone oven mat, coat with liquid polymer clay, place it and cure it in a covered pan and according to the manufacturer’s instructions.  Avoid using anything that might create toxic fumes when exposed to heat (used dryer sheets, plastics, etc.)

Resources

Books

  • Tissue Fabric” is covered in Fabric Art Collage, 40+ Mixed Media Techniques, by Rebekah Meier. Glue-water is used.
  • Paper cloth is covered in Stitch Alchemy, Combining Fabric + Paper for Mixed-Media Art, by Kelli Perkins. This book has more of a focus on it. Glue-water is used.
  • “Making Fabric from Paper” (ch 4) appears in The Quiting Arts Book, Techniques and Inspiration for Creating One-of-a-Kind Quilts, by Patricia Bolton. Yes indeed, it’s paper cloth put together with diluted glue. Beryl Taylor contrubuted.
  • Fabric paper is covered in The Cloth Paper Scissors Book, Techniques and Inspiration for Creating Mixed-Media Art, by Barbara Delaney. Look for the “Building Upon Layers, Detailed Design Made Easy” section of Chapter 2: Printmaking and Surace Design, see pages 36 – 39. Once again, Beryl Taylor contributed. Glue-water is used.
  • Paper cloth is covered in Mixed Media Explorations, by Beryl Taylor.
  • Paper cloth is covered in Mixed-Media Master Class with Sherrill Kahn: 50+ Surface-Design Techniques for Fabric & Paper, by Sherrill Kahn.  Glue-water is used but the “glue” is matte gel, an artist acrylic medium.
  • From Image to Stitch, by Maggie Grey covered creating a stitchable paper-fabric using crumbled, printed upon, waxed, bonded brown packaging paper.  No glue-water used. (How about using Golden Acrylic’s GAC 900 to prepare the paper for printing, I ask?)
  • Maggie Grey covers “Background 3: Brown Paper and Bondaweb (fusible webbing)” in Chapter 1: Making Backgrounds of her book Raising the Surface with Machine Embroidery. No glue-water used in that recipe either.

DVD