The Fine Art Air-Dry and Polymer Clay Market Can Be Confusing for the Beginner to Intermediate Artist

What this page is and isn’t about — It’s about fine art air-dry and polymer clays. It’s not about ceramic, cold porcelain, resin clay, epoxy clays, or any kiln-cured products.

This page was written after reading https://www.reviewstream.com/reviews/?p=155083#thoughts-box, which was about Premier clay, which is an artist grade air-dry clay, and the beginner’s needs and understandable confusion.

For jewelry making, Premo!, Fimo Classic, Kato, and Cernit are some of your better choices of oven-cured polymer clays –they’re durable enough and do not have to be sealed unless certain surface treatments (mica powders like Pearl Ex or Perfect Pearls…) require it. See: https://thebluebottletree.com/seal-polymer-clay/

Durability… While people making charms often use various air-dry clays, they usually don’t construct bracelets or rings out of air-dry clays. Jewelry may take much more wear and tear.

Seal it or not? As a rule, air-dry clays generally have to be sealed once dry and finished but oven-cured polymer clays don’t. (Two-part epoxy clays don’t have to be sealed but although they’re often called air-dry, they actually cure by chemical reaction and may even be able to cure under water. They’re not true air-dry clays.)

Cracks in Premier clay.… Cracks don’t mean your air-dry clay is weak. Premier is one of the strongest air-dry clays. Nearly all air-dry clays have some shrinkage and Premier is no exception, although it shrinks less than some air-dry clays. Having a good armature, if armature is necessary, and using minimal amounts of water while sculpting with Premier can decrease the likelihood or severity of cracks. Sometimes cracks happen but they’re easily be repaired with Premier, even if your item dried. See the below video. Cracks may occur if you added too much water while sculpting, used a cardboard armature, used thin clay over a rigid armature (Ostrich legs, for example), let your item dry too quickly, or didn’t support sculpture parts subject to gravity. Don’t dry your Premier clay items under a fan, for example. Do remember to keep unused clay in an air-tight bag and/or container.

For figurative works, Premix, an air-dry clay made by the same company as Premier, is easier to sculpt and blend than Premier. Doll artist Hannie Sarris loved Premix clay. Premier clay may take some different sculpting techniques than what one would be used to with polymer clay and one uses minimal (!) amounts of water are used while sculpting Premier. People working with these air-dry clays might lightly dab their fingers across a wet sponge to keep clay moist enough while sculpting. They may use a mister type of water bottle. Do not use Sculpey Clay Softener or any type of oil to soften, smooth, and blend these air-dry clays — they are hybrid clays and have their own characteristics, sculpting techniques, storage and compatibility considerations. They’re not like the majority of polymer clays that are oven-cured (e.g., Fimo Classic, Fimo Soft, Cernit, Fimo Doll, Premo!). They’re not like most air-dry clays on the market. They are used by a number of very famous art doll artists and others.

So yes, there are indeed air-dry polymer clays — Activa Lumina Translucent Polymer Clay, Staedtler Fimo Air Basic Modeling Clay, and Activa LaDoll Premier clay are examples of air-dry polymer clays. Activa, the company that makes laDoll Premier clay, describes Premier clay as a type of polymer clay on their site. Lumina has long been known to the polymer clay community. Fimo Air Basic is weaker than either of those.

Polymer clays have their own issues — Dirt, lint, hair, compatibility issues, and baking considerations (always monitor your oven with two oven thermometers, not counting the oven’s own temperature reading). If you look at it that way, a few easily repaired cracks in Premier clay items isn’ts a bad deal.

Sculpey Diluent, AKA liquid Sculpey Clay Softener, works with oven-cured polymer clays, specifically, and not with air-dry polymer clays. Here’s the Sculpey Clay Softener Material Safety Data Sheet: https://www.sculpey.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Clay-Softener-SDS-10282015.pdf

In contrast, Makin’s, Hearty, Das, “cold porcelain” clays, Creative Paperclay, Celluclay, and epoxy putties are not polymer clays no matter who describes them as such.

For a whole lot of information on all things polymer and air-dry clay, see:

…Or go to clay manufacturers’ sites and hit their FAQs and MSDS pages. I wish there were sculpting, storage, compatibility, MSDS and other information (to seal or not to seal) with each clay package that one takes home, but that’s sadly not the case.

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Earthenware Greenware Handmade Ceramic Goddess Pendant, by Karen A. Scofield

Why Goddess Pendants or Focal Beads?


Before there were pussy hats, there were Goddess pendants. After pussy hats, there will still be Goddess pendants. 

Earthenware Greenware Handmade Ceramic Goddess Pendant, by Karen A. Scofield

Earthenware Greenware Handmade Ceramic Goddess Pendant, by Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

Why Goddess Pendants? To better answer that, we have to understand the many reasons we make any human figurative art or study female/Goddess figures throughout human history. See http://suppressedhistories.net/

In some languages, the word for history also means storyhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History

Micaceous Rock and "Yellow Gold Glitter" Premo Polymer Clay Mix, by Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

Micaceous Rock and “Yellow Gold Glitter” Premo Polymer Clay Mix, by Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

Through my beads, I’m telling my story — I’m a woman, domestic abuse survivor, an artist, I’m on the autism spectrum, and my Goddess pendants help tell my story in the contexts of an interest in equality, as opposed to abuse and sexism.  My beads are about equality and power — it’s abuse vs. equality. Women’s rights and Goddess stuff are considered too minority interest, too fringe despite the fact that half the world is female, and that’s a problem. Goddess/female figures may even be banned or get demonized.

Handmade Goddess Pendants, by Karen A. Scofield

Handmade Goddess Pendants, by Karen A. Scofield

Example 1: I had drawn renditions of the Venus of Willendorf, a world famous archaeological find, on shrink plastic and made pendants of them. fThese shrink plastic beads were banned on Myspace as obscene. Here’s what they looked like.

A Shrink Plastic Representation of the World Famous Venus of Willendorf, by Karen A. Scofield
Example 2: I wore a Goddess necklace to Walmart. The cashier suggested I could make money selling them as rather, tee-hee, lewd little party favors at bachelor or bachelorette parties. She had absolutely no inkling that she shouldn’t simply sexualize and peg them in such a narrow, restrictive manner, as opposed to all that the Goddess concept can potentially encompass on a daily basis. Equality touches all all aspects of life, and this shouldn’t be marginalized, pegged as a lewd/lesbian thing, or treated as a fringe topic. Anyway, my Goddess pendant was profane image to her, but to those that wear them, Goddess art and pendants are more of a spiritual and intellectual thing and, more specifically, symbolize spiritual and social equality. They embody, invoke, and evoke this.

As an artist, I cultivate messages and images that are needed, rather than what people are conditioned to lap up from the pundits, pulpits, and consumerism. It concerns me that the world is full of “sanitized,” corporate-made, mainstream images and messages about women and their bodies, messages that are loaded with sexism both overt and/or insidious.

The pussy hat phenomenon shows us that feminine symbols of equality ARE needed. There is the desire to create our world pluralistically without the reality filters of sexism, cultural triumphalism, racism, or creedism (religious prejudice). I desire more autonomous and honest dialog and equality, and I hope you do too.

We still live in a world in which women often don’t get paid the same amount for doing the same job no matter how well they do it, or even if they do it better. As a US citizen, I live in a country in which a considerable majority of art gallery artists are male. It’s a country in which women’s art generally sells for only a small fraction of the profit that art made by men can fetch. We live in a world in which the majority of religion is really male-centric and male-dominated. We live in a world in which men’s voices are given more weight and are heard more. It’s not Goddess, it’s God with no room for any female divine. Instead, we still have the Madonna-Whore Complex. The feminine divine either is falsely demonized, socially/theologically outlawed (or banned), or turned into a whore.

Anti-intellectual, male dominated paradigms hold feminine equality at odds with more formative power structures, be they economic, religious, artistic, or what have you. How is sexism considered to be the fabric of society? And what does that have to do with domestic violence anyway?

See “The Ascent of Woman”http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0693dsh

Domestic Abuse and the Metaparadigm (Mother World View) of Abuse/War

the most reliable indicator of whether or not there is violence inside a country, or whether it will use military violence against another country, is not poverty or access to natural resources or religion or even degree of democracy. It’s violence against females.” — from “Gloria Steinem’s new show links global instability to violence against women: “For the first time there are fewer females on earth than males

The Power and Control (Abuse) and Equality (Nonviolence) wheels, what they mean, what they look like in current events or everyday situations are sadly only usually discussed, shown, or used during domestic abuse prevention/recovery. They are, in fact, paradigmatic and are applicable on a personal, local, national, and global scale. Here’s what goes on with the Power and Control (Abuse) paradigm.

Methods of abusive power and control have been and continue to be used as social, legal, religious, and financial weapons and they often result in violence, be it domestic or wartime violence. The Power and Control wheel/paradigm is diametrically opposed to Equality because it relies on abusive imbalances of power. This is true whether they pretend to protect us and have our best interests in mind or whether they lay bare their prejudices, sexism, and ambitions.  It takes power and rights away from others in order to feel powerful and it’s a massive failure of imagination.

Here’s a page from my art journal on the Equality (nonviolence) power wheel. Notice the notes on imagination.

image

Art Journal. Equality. Power. Tools of Change.

Art is the Antidote

How is it that society today hasn’t quit its addiction to prejudice, bigotry, sexism and the like? I don’t pretend to understand all that and I hope I never do. I can imagine many other paths to power. I can imagine sharing it. And as a woman and an artist, I shape a more inclusive world in clay, canvas, paper, fiber, cloth, and words. Art is an antidote. Symbols matter. Symbols are powerful and my art beads are ones I can bring into all sorts of every day settings.

Can You Condition Hard, Crumbly Polymer Clay or Should You Get New Clay?

Hard and crumbly polymer clay could be older, partially cured, or the plasticizer has evaporated or leached out. Some clays tend to be more crumbly by nature if older than a year or so old, e.g., Cernit Doll clay. The question is, can it be successfully , softened, conditioned and then used?

Bottom Line or Pro — Unless the clay had been cured, most hard, crumbly clay can be softened.

Pro: Not all methods of softening difficult-to-condition polymer clay require adding products.

Possible Con: Adding products changes the way clay feels and behaves so some techniques will require new, fresh clay instead. If in doubt, test.

Work it or Buy Fresh Clay? That’s a decision that you’ll make based on a variety of criteria. Personally, with the price of larger “bricks” of different doll clays, which is mostly what I have, I’m going to choose “work it” more often than not. I’ve worked really old clay (10 to 15 years old) for 30 to 40 minutes, conditioned it, and used it with satisfactory to excellent results. Often, it doesn’t take nearly that much effort.  If it hurts your hands to work the clay into submission, you might want to consider using a mallet or NeverKnead (a machine).

Goal: The Goal of Methods 1, 2, and 3 are to make it possible to clump your clay together and run through the pasta machine repeatedly and/or work it with your hands in order to condition your polymer clay.

Method 1: Put it in a zip lock baggie then. in your pocket or otherwise against your skin for a bit to warm it up.

Now try to condition it.

Method 2: It’s not too stiff and crumbly but still needs a little more help?

Soften it with physical manipulation, additives, or a combination of physical conditioning methods and adding new materials to make it supple and workable. Here are your options. I’ll let you be the judge as to whether physical efforts vs. additives are your best options for your techniques.

  • Whack It — Whack the clay with a rubber mallet to “get things moving.” A few good whacks can “jumpstart” conditioning — the more you whack it, the better it behaves, generally.
  • NeverKnead (Tool)– NeverKnead is a modified arbor press that smashes polymer clay. It allows you to condition it without hurting your hands. This can be a boon to those with arthritis.
  • Use Clay Softener (Diluent) or Translucent Clay – Work some softener or translucent clay into it. Start with smaller amounts!  you can always add more but it’s difficult to leech it back out.
  • Translucent clays – Translucent clays have more softening agent  and many clayers soften their crumbly clay by adding some translucent clay.
  • Fimo MixQuick — Fimo MixQuick helps soften hard polymer clay.
  • Sculpey Mold Maker – Sculpey Mold Maker can also help soften hard polymer clay.

Now try to condition it.

 Method 3: If it’s really hard, crumbly, and unresponsive

  • Chop — Chop up the clay in tiny bit using a blade or dedicated food processor.
  • Add — Add Sculpey Clay Softener, mineral/baby oil, liquid polymer clay, or Fimo MixQuick to your polymer clay, if you didn’t already, or maybe again if it needs it, and mix.
  • Simmer” in a Ziplock Bag — Place in a zip lock sandwich bag let sit for a few days in a cool, dry, dark place so that the liquid or plasticizers in Fimo MixQuick seep into the hard clay and soften your clay.
  • Repeat — Repeat the process with more liquid or Fimo MixQuick if necessary.
  • NeverKnead/Mallet — Whack the clay with a rubber mallet to “get things moving” and/or use the NeverKnead.

Now Try to condition it. Again, the goal of the above 3 methods is to make it possible to clump your clay together and then condition it in the pasta machine and/or with your hands.

 “Conditioning Fail”

If even method 3 doesn’t work, your clay was probably partially cured. It can be used as clay crumbles in faux rock or other uses, perhaps, or it can be thrown out.

Prevention

Avoid ordering your clays in the hotter summer months, buy clay only just before you need it, and consider your storage conditions. Your clay is supposed to be stored in a cool, dry, dark place. Many people try to order the clay just before use. Others found a bargain and store it until later.

I have clays that are 10 years and older that I’ve conditioned and used. We have central air. I store my clays out of the sunlight in a cool, dry, dark place.

Polymer clay can start partially curing at 90-something degrees F. So while it’s okay to warm polymer clay against your body before conditioning for short periods of time, never leave your polymer clay in a hot car while shopping or on a warm windowsill. Store it in a cool, dry, dark place…about 74 degrees or lower, ideally. If you don’t have a house or other storage in which you can keep it 74 degrees or lower, your clay may not fare well if stored for longer periods of time.

See: Glassattic.com’s page on storage

Polymer Doll Clay Storage by Karen A. Scofield

Cernit Doll-Making Clay — Conditioning and More

Naysayers, Difficult First Experiences and Crumbly Clay

Unless it’s very fresh, Cernit Doll clays can be hard and crumbly out of the package … but it’s one of the best polymer doll clays on the market. That confuses a lot of people because most clays are partially cured when they’re crumbly like that (partial curing can start to occur at 90 degrees F). Cernit clay, however, can be crumbly just because that’s its nature if it’s not manufactured quite recently. Don’t immediately assume this polymer clay is impossible to work with just because it’s crumbly.

See “Can You Condition Hard, Crumbly Polymer Clay or Should You Get New Clay?” It lists three methods of conditioning hard, crumbly polymer clay. Adding Fimo MixQuick isn’t so much a problem with doll clay, specifically, because many doll clay artists already do that to add flexibility so little fingers and toes don’t break off so easily during shipping.

Weighing Quality vs. Conditioning Work

Is Cernit Doll-Making clay more difficult to condition? Sometimes. The quality of the clay, it’s strength, the skin-like transparency level and color can be worth it and many hyperrealistic art doll artists choose Cernit Doll clays. With Cernit Doll clay, you can have more control over the softness and firmness of the clay once it’s conditioned precisely because it’s more temperature sensitive. That can be a tremendous plus.

Conditioning Older Cernit Doll-Making Clay

Food Processor to the Rescue! — I’ve had great success with taking the old Cernit Doll clay and mixing it with Puppen Fimo (now Fimo Professional Doll Art Clay) and/or a 1/3 to a 1/2 package of Fimo Mix Quick (which one can get from JerrysArtarama.com).  Place these in a larger food processor that can handle harder work and whir it around on high until it’s very finely pilled. If the Cernit is really hard and crumbly, I  put my Cernit Doll clay into a food processor until it becomes a fine crumbly mess. Then I add the Fimo Mix Quick and maybe some Puppen Fimo too.

Some of it will stick to the food processor walls but a rubber/silicone spatula can help you get it out.

Jar or Bag It and Let it Sit — Remove the contents into a wide mouth glass container or zip lock bag. I prefer the glass jars. Let it sit for a few days to let the plasticizerrs on the MixQuick do their work and soften crumbly clay.

Fastidiously Clean Your Food Processor As Soon As Possible — Clean with rubbing alcohol and wipes and dry before next use.

Labeling and Attaching a Baked Chip — Once the clay is in my glass jar, I take an index card write what’s in the glass jar, how old the clay is, and baking instructions. I pause to bake a well blended chip. I have found I can easily punch a hole in a 1/4″ thick chip with a hole puncher meant for paper. I tie it to a string and attach the chip with the string to the glass jar that contains the far clay or clay mix. If I have any notes about tendency toward moons or to darken while baking, I add that to the index card and tape it to the glass container.

Cover your Jar — If you think it might sit a while, you can cover your jar with a pillow case or homemade cover to keep out the light.

Use It — When I’m ready to work with it, I put on disposable latex gloves (not thicker household rubber gloves), pinch together a bit of clay, and start conditioning it with my hands. I work on a clean polymer clay mat and will often rub my work station and hands with scrap polymer clay kept for this purpose — it picks up what your hand washing and wipes may have left behind.

If that doesn’t work, refer to “Can You Condition Hard, Crumbly Polymer Clay or Should You Get New Clay?” again.

Polymer Clay Storage

Polymer Clay Storage

Some Cernit Doll Polymer Clay Information

Origin: Belgium. Made by The Clay and Paint Factory S.A. Yes, they have a Facebook page.

Availability: May be more easily available in Europe and other places than in the US.

Cernit MSDS: http://cdn.dickblick.com/msds/DBH_33904XXXX.pdf

Artist Grade: Yes. Cernit is more translucent and stronger than ProSculpt, another artist grade polymer clay, once conditioned and cured properly. (Reportedly, one can add Premo translucent to Prosculpt to get something close to Cernit but then it begins to work like Cernit — hard at first and then too soft – without becoming as quite as strong as Cernit.)

Strength and Durability: One of the strongest clays in its properly conditioned and cured state.

Shipping: Cernit is more susceptible to transportation and storage temperatures/conditions when in the raw. Cured, it’s one of the strongest clays but finished works still should be well protected/padded during shipping.

Shelf Life: It should be stored in a cool, dry, dark place. Some people have used 20-year-old Cernit with no problems. Obviously, it may last this long only if transported/kept in a cool, dark, dry place. Reformulations may affect shelf life? The brand is more sensitive to transportation and storage temperatures than other clays.

Multiple Stations: It saves time and sometimes a great deal of frustration to have different stations at which to paint, sew/costume, play with settings, and photograph. For example, once I got wool roving all over my work station, loose bits and all, fibers flying into the air (no, I didn’t shake it about), I had to clean my work station and studio several times and still found those little wool fibers here and there. They’re a pain to get out of polymer clay. So I have a folding table in the living room to use as a wigging and costuming station. I wish I had the space for various permanent work stations but I don’t, so folding table it is!

Cernit Doll Clay Colors: Has range of doll clay colors and can be mixed with each other or other brands to tint. Cernit Doll Biscuit color deepens after baking and Cernit Doll Almond is not quite as yellow.

Conditioning: Warm briefly but sufficiently against body before conditioning. It’s misleadingly crumbly right out of the package but once conditioned may produce superior results, providing that the reason that it’s crumbly is not because it was partially cured due to improper transport or storage temperature. (Most clays are crumbly because they’re partially cured but Cernit is crumbly out of the package before conditioning because that’s the nature of the clay, unless it’s freshly made within the last month(s).) To condition, try pressing it for a while at first more than rolling and twisting. It may get “sticky” if it becomes too warm in the hands. Proper conditioning is crucial to attaining the clay’s ceramic-like, slightly translucent quality though.

Note: Stays softer longer once conditioned, as opposed to other brands of polymer clay.

Cross-Brand Mixability: Yes. Cernit can be mixed with other brands of polymer clay and Fimo MixQuick.

Sculpting: Uses some different sculpting techniques than the rest of the polymer clays. Some people make their doll in Super Sculpey or another clay, create a mold, and then make their item out of Cernit Doll Clay. Others do fine by using warm tools and/or hands when blending clay during a sculpt. Many (most?) sculpt and series bake (bake then proceed to next stage/part) when using Cernit Doll. Lighter colors may make it more difficult to see sculpting details. Check with a mirror and photos that you take of it.

Blending: It is reportedly the most difficult to smear or blend one piece onto another – a feathering and pressure method is often used. Some people report that a Cernit 50/50 with the Classic Fimo blend makes for better doll sculpting. Many add Fimo QuickMix to Cernit and use Sculpey diluent to ease blending.

Armatures: Cernit can get softer while sculpting and baking and needs more excellent and carefully constructed support (armature) than perhaps other clays might.

Water: No! Cernit possesses a filler (natural clay, possibly kaolinite) that absorbs moisture. Therefore, talc or cornstarch are the better release agents and Sculpey Diluent/Softener is better for smoothing the clay than using water.

“If your clay is burning, the temperature of your oven is too high. Address your temperature, not your bake times! Baking longer is never what causes burns if temperature and baking methods are correct.” — http://thebluebottletree.com/how-long-bake-polymer-clay/

While you can rebake your doll many times, you may want to avoid bake times longer than necessary when using the light colored doll clays. Light colored and translucent clays can yellow an darken a bit if baked too long. Experiment and know your clay.

“The instructions on the package are what is going to give adequate results for most consumers. They are not designed to give the optimal results for perfect and controlled conditions. Feel free to do your best to create the best possible baking conditions for your polymer clay so that you can get the best results possible.” — http://thebluebottletree.com/how-long-bake-polymer-clay/

Avoiding Cracks, Plaques and Oven Hot Spots

Know Your Oven – Test your oven — Moniter temperature throughout the baking process, with one to two independent oven thermometers.

Test Your Brands and its Particular Colors – Lighter colors and translucent clays are more susceptible to darkening or yellowing while baking. Test, test, test. Test bake times and temperatures in of your brands and colors. Also, lighter and translucent colors will have to be buried in baking soda and/or covered with polyester polyfil.

Cure the clay without sudden temperature changes. Place your covered and protected polymer clay piece(s) into a cool oven, turn the oven to the correct temperature, and begin timing only once the proper temperature has been reached. Once baked, turn off the oven but leave your items inside the oven until they have cooled. This is to help avoid cracks and fissures.

Some people bury their Cernit beads or dolls in baking soda to avoid thermal shock and to insulate from oven hot spots. Dolls can lay on a bed of baking soda.

Others protect against thermal shock or hot spots by covering item(s) or parts of it with polyester batting (does not burn or melt at these temperatures).

Information for Before You Bake Your Doll 

  • Lighter Colors of Doll Clay — Lighter and translucent colors will have to be buried in baking soda and/or covered with polyester polyfil.
  • Series Baking — Cernit can be baked in stages (“series baking”) so you can add fine details without marring the sculpted piece. Let the clay cool completely between each layer to prevent air pockets and defects in the finished piece.
  • Sufficient Oven Temperatures — Cure at sufficient temperatures and avoid water or too much hand sweat in order to avoid cracking/figures but verify your oven’s temperature with a separate thermometer (or two!) and to cover your items while baking to protect against burning or dark spots.
  • Polyfil for the Delicate Areas — Cover delicate fingers, toes and other parts with thick layer of polyfil.
  • Choice of Oven — A digital convection oven is more temperature accurate than a regular home oven and a toaster oven is your most volatile and least accurate, as far as temperature accuracy and steady temperature are concerned. The reason that toaster ovens are your worst choice is that it doesn’t circulate the heat and spikes occasionally in order to bake! A regular home oven can suffice just fine with proper testing, baking, and monitoring methods.
  • Choice of Cooking Container – You want a covered or tented pan for baking your dolls. Metal pans and wing components heat up faster and higher than glass, ceramic and many other materials. If the recommended temperature says 265-275 it will bake correctly on glass, but be darker on the edges if you use metal cookware. Surround your doll with a layer of polyfil and monitor delicate wings and fins as much as you can while they are in the oven.
    • Convection Oven Tent — Some people tent their doll, meaning they create a tent of aluminum foil over a basic tent armature and use that as a tent to put over their doll while baking in a digital convection oven.
    • The Home Oven Disposable Pan “Clamshell” – Create an enclosed baking contain by placing one disposable aluminum baking pan over another to create a covered cooking pan, then clip shut on both ends. You’ll have placed a glossy ceramic tile on the bottom of this and will have surrounded your doll with polyfil, including a layer of polyfil under it to prevent flat, shiny spots where the doll rested on the tile. Or the doll can lay on a bed of baking soda and have hands and feet wrapped in polyfil.

One Possible Doll Curing Method

  • Test Bake with Independent Thermometers — Do a test firing before baking each doll. Test your oven with one to two independent oven thermometers. Do not depend on the oven’s indicator regarding whether the proper temperature has supposedly been reached. Test your oven’s actual internal temperature for about 40 minutes to see if it a) attains the desired temperature and b) doesn’t spike high enough to burn your doll. It is possible to burn parts of the doll but underbake the rest of your doll.
  • First Bake – Place your art doll in a cold oven, set the oven temp so that it actually attains 230 degrees F. Once it attains that temperature, set your time for 18 minutes or so. This first bake can decrease chance of cracks and fissures and firms the doll up just enough to work it before the final cure. You must do the following though.
  • Cool the Oven With Doll in It — When your timer goes off, prop the oven door open a bit and let it cool completely. Do not handle your doll. Keep it in the oven with the door open a bit and let cool completely.
  • First Scrape and/or Sand — Scrape and or sand with 320 – 600 grit fine wet/dry sandpaper, keeping the sandpaper wet while working. Scrape larger lumps, sand the rest of the body. Rinse your doll clean.
  • Acetone Rub — Clean it lightly with acetone and a cosmetic cotton pad if you need to remove white scratches or lumps found in any larger areas of your doll.
  • Second Bake — Place your art doll in a cold oven, set the oven temp so that it actually attains 270 degrees F. Once it attains that temperature, then set your time according to the doll’s thickness.
  • Cool the Oven with the Doll in It — When your timer goes off, prop the oven door open a bit and let it cool completely.
  • Painting – You do not have to heat set acrylics. If you use Genesis Paints, once it’s painted, put your doll back in oven and fire for 5 minutes at 250 degrees using the above method of placing your doll in a cold oven, etc.
  • Cool the Oven With Doll in It — When your timer goes off, prop the oven door open a bit and let it cool completely.
  • Embossing Gun Option for Genesis Paints — An embossing gun cures the genesis paint faster and is a better way than putting the doll back into the oven for that paint firing. One must use a thermometer to monitor temperature, however, and constantly move the Embossing Heat Gun back and forth over the surface of the painted areas to avoid burning, etc.

A Nice Youtube Video on Mixing Cernit Doll-Making Clay with Puppen Fimo polymer clay

http://youtu.be/wtfmlPq7JcQ