Bisque Fired Handmade Earthenware Ceramic Clay Goddess Pendants by Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

My First Ceramic Bisque Fired Goddess Pendants

Bisque Fired Handmade Earthenware Ceramic Clay Goddess Pendants by Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

Bisque Fired Handmade Earthenware Ceramic Clay Goddess Pendants by Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

Yes, another picture and video of my beads but these are my very first ceramic fired anything! It took several weeks for them to get fired (not my schedule, not my kiln), but here they are before an iron oxide wash that will give them an earthy iron color. Weeeeee! I have to grok at them some more because I DID THESE! Me! He he.

Taps all fingertips together at once … what else can I do with cermamic clay without a wheel?

Sculpted Goddess Pendant strung with wooden and ceramic beads, By Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

Sculpted Goddess Pendant strung with wooden and ceramic beads, By Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

 

Painting of an Anthropomorphized Sun Shimmer," 24"x24", by Karen A. Scofield. 2016

My Fourth Painting: “Shimmer,” 24″x24″

Painting of an Anthropomorphized Sun Shimmer,

Painting of an Anthropomorphized Sun Shimmer,” 24″x24″, by Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

 

karensfourthsunblackandwhitetonal

Black and white of Karen A. Scofield’s anthropomorphized sun. Tonal.

 

Painting of an Anthropomorphized Sun Shimmer,” 24″x24″, by Karen A. Scofield. 2016.

It’s going to be in the next open show at Artworks Kenosha (WI). It has a bit of an optical illusion to it.

I had done a study for the painting previously but the quality of work in this painting is far more professional and I painted while through a magnifying glass for a lot of this, not that doing so defines professional or fine art.

I used an isolation layer using Golden Polymer Medium before varnishing it.

Here are some stages of the work before completion.

Earthenware clay figurative pendants, by Karen A. Scofield

Ceramic Clay Dare: I Sculpt a Goddess Pendant on Camera

I sculpted with polymer clay before and, in ceramic clay, I sculpted the backside of a bead without a mold. Now I have dared myself to sculpt an entire bead without the use of any of my molds ( I molded my own beads)in earthenware clay, a medium still very new to me. So I did this on camera.

I’ll get better at filming. And sculpting. But for now, at least I know I can do this and I feel a lot better about doing 20, 50, or more figurative pendants like this, in different sizes and styles of course.

The Finished Pendant (Standing)

Earthenware clay figurative pendants, by Karen A. Scofield

Earthenware clay figurative pendants, by Karen A. Scofield

Earthenware clay figurative pendants, by Karen A. Scofield

Earthenware clay figurative pendants, by Karen A. Scofield

July 21, 2017 Note: I’ve ordered ceramic clay sculpting tools!

Earthenware Clay ceramic Goddess pendants to be bisque fired, by Karen A. Scofield

Earthenware Clay Ceramic Goddess Pendants Ready for Bisque Firing

Earthenware Clay ceramic Goddess pendants to be bisque fired, by Karen A. Scofield

Earthenware Clay ceramic Goddess pendants, need to be bisque fired, by Karen A. Scofield

So I’ve done that.  By the time they’re completely done, to the last glaze firing, each Goddess pendant will have taken well over two or three hours hands-on time, specifically, to make. At minimum.

This does not count the time taken for prototype and bead mold development. I used polymer clays for those steps.

It also does not count the time to transport the pendants to the kiln to get fired several times (they will be glazed) or any effort involved in selling them (websites, teaching, writing, making videos…whatever it takes to beat obscurity and poverty).

I first envisioned popping these beauties out in just seconds, with them ready to be fired.  I found that bead molds for such curvaceous figurative beads are more like guidelines. That might not be such the case with shallower, less curvaceous pendants. We shall see.

I found the trick in creating these ceramic beads is to use perhaps damper clay than usual so I can get the clay smoothly and deeply into the mold without creases or partial filling of deeper areas. However, this means I work on these beauties quite a bit after I pop them out of the mold due to distortion and marring.

When I tried to fix these distortion errors, I create other distortions while doing that, the clay is so soft. So I have to fix those and back-and-forth it goes for a while until I am satisfied.

When I add the bellybutton (which takes 3 tools) and details of the pelvic area and lines of the derrière,  there’s this same back-and-forth process of perfecting and correcting.

Aaaaand the same process happens for the bead holes. In the process of creating them, I create distortions that I have to fix and while  I’m fixing those, that might create distortions…and back-and-forth it goes until I’m  satisfied.

I work on these earthenware pendants both wet and dry — I also sand them and finally buff them carefully on my big, super thick as terry cloth bathrobe.